3rd Grade

Classes 3-217 and 3-319
Non-Objective Painting and Collage


Third grade students are working on a Non-Objective art unit.  In this unit, students will create a Non-Objective painting using a color scheme of his/her choice.  Completed paintings will be cut into squares and re-assembled into a Non-Objective collage as seen above.  Students will be focusing on creating balance of line, shape, and color in both their painting and collage.
Check below for home link options that students can do to earn extra credit for this project.

Home Link Option 1: View Power Point from class.
Sit together as a family and look at this power point.  Students should be able to explain the basic concepts of Non-Objective art that we have discussed in class.  Answer one of the questions from the presentation in a complete paragraph.  Place your name and class on top of the sheet with the paragraph and submit it to Mrs. Wine in class.  OR....you may type your answer and send it to Mrs. Wine at ewine@schools.nyc.gov.  Make sure to include your name and class on emailed response.

Non-Objective Power Point

Home Link Option 2:  Dice Non-Objective Drawing Game
Get a dice from a board game you have at home and a blank sheet of paper.  Click on the link below and follow the directions to create your own Non-Objective drawings.  Roll the dice one time to determine what type of line to draw on your paper.  Roll a second time to determine what shape to draw on your paper.  You may draw more than one line or shape.  Continue rolling and drawing until your drawings is completed.  If you have someone at home to play with you (a parent, brother, sister, or cousin), then have them roll and draw their own drawing.  Compare and contrast the drawings you have done.  Place your name and class on the back of your drawing and turn it in to Mrs. Wine to earn extra credit.  Bring in the drawings your family  and friends did too.
Non-Objective Dice Game

Home Link Option 3:  Comparing and Contrasting 
Watch these two YouTube videos that demonstrate different ways of making Non-Objective paintings.  Compare and contrast the two ways to create Non-Objective art.  Which painting technique would you like to try?  Why would you like to try this way?  Write your response in a paragraph for extra credit.   Place your name and class on top of the sheet with the paragraph and submit it to Mrs. Wine in class.  OR....you may type your answer and send it to Mrs. Wine at ewine@schools.nyc.gov.  Make sure to include your name and class on emailed response.  For even more fun, try making your own Non-Objective art inspired by one of these videos.









Classes  3-219 and 3-215
Zentangle Landscape Painting and Drawing


Third grade students are looking at Zentangles, a special type of doodle design developed by Massachusetts artists Maria Thomas and Rick Roberts in 2004.  This new art form helps increase focus and creativity.  Lines are used to create repeating patterns that seem to get “tangled” up with each other.  Creating Zentangles is relaxing.  It is a “zen” activity that is like artful meditation or “yoga for the mind.” Students will create their own simple landscape drawing and add Zentangle designs to make it unique.  Then students will add color to their drawing with washes of watercolor paint.  Complete one of the activities below and submit it to Mrs. Wine to earn extra credit points in art class.

Option 1:  Review the Power Point we looked at in class together as a family.  Students should be able to describe what they see in each image.  Answer one of the questions from one of the slides and turn in your response for extra credit.  Please make sure your name, class number and the question are on you paper.  Students may also submit their response via email to ewine@schools.nyc.gov


Option 2:  Create a Zentangle design that has a different subject, not a landscape.  You may use an animal, object from nature, food item, or just basic letters or shapes as your inspiration.  Draw the basic shape of the object first.  Then add a few lines to divide the object into different sections.  Finally, add Zentangle patterns.  You may use one color or many colors for your designs.  Look at the examples below to help you get an idea.  Parents and students may work on this together!!!  Turn in your drawing to Mrs. Wine with your name and class on the back.


Option 3:  Write your name in block or bubble letters.  Ask an older student or adult to help you write the letters if you need help.  Divide each letter into 3 - 4 sections. Draw Zentangle patterns to fill each section of each letter.  Use different line and different shapes to create your patterns.  Work to make different values with your designs.  Place your name and class on the back of the drawing and give it to Mrs. Wine in class to earn extra credit.




Previously This Year...

Abstract Faces of Alexej von Jawlensky

Third grade students are looking at the works of Russian born artist Alexej von Jawlensky.  They noted how he used color in his works to show a feeling or emotion.  Artists who used color in this way were called Expressionists.  Students also discovered how his work became more abstract throughout his career.  In this project, students will create their own abstract portraits and use chalk pastels to add color to express feelings.  Complete one of the activities below and submit it to Mrs. Wine to earn extra credit points in art class.

Option 1:  Review the Power Point we looked at in class together as a family.  Students should be able to describe what they see in each image.  Answer one of the questions from one of the slides and turn in your response for extra credit.  Please make sure your name, class number and the question are on you paper.  Students may also submit their response via email to ewine@schools.nyc.gov


Option 2:  Compare and contrast these three works by Jawlensky.  Write a paragraph describing how his work changed and developed from less abstract to more abstract.  Explain how these three works are the same and how they are different.  Submit your response to Mrs. Wine in class or email it to her at ewine@schools.nyc.gov.  Make sure you include your name and class on your response.









Option 3:  Create your own abstract portrait at home.  Use some of the same types of lines and shapes that Jawlensky did to make the face look abstract.  Work together with a member of your family on your portrait.  How could you teach a parent or even a younger brother or sister to draw an abstract face in the style of Jawlensky?  Add color to your work using the material of your choice.  Think about what kind of feeling you want to show with your color.  Place your name on the back of your work.  Bring your drawing to Mrs. Wine to earn extra credit.  If someone else in the family also created a drawing, ask them to put their name on the back of the drawing and bring it to class too.


Last Year....

Class 3-317 and Choice of 3-315
Students in class 3-317 and some students in 3-315 are learning about the Japanese art of Gyotaku.  The word Gyotaku means "fish rubbing" and was developed in Japan over 100 years ago. It was originally used to accurately measure fish, but is currently done as an art form.  Students will create a background by drawing and painting. Then students will engrave a foam plate with a fish.  The fish will be printed 2 - 3 times.  The best relief print will be chosen, cut out, and glued onto the background.  
Look below to find enrichment and extra credit options for this project.


Home LInk Option One:  View Class Power Point
Sit with someone in your family and look at the Power Point we viewed in class.  Explain what you learned about gyotaku in class.  Look at the student examples on the last slide.  Which one do you like best?  Why do you think it is the best print?  Write a paragraph to explain your answer.  Submit your paragraph to Mrs. Wine with your name and class number on it to earn extra credit.

Option 2:  Create Your Own Fish Themed Artwork
Look at the examples of artworks below that use fish as a theme.  Create your own drawing or painting of a fish in any style you like.  Submit your drawing or painting to Mrs. Wine with your name and class on the back.




Classes  3-315, 3-215,and 3-219
Mola Inspired Collage

Third grade students are using Mola artworks from Panama as the inspiration for a collage project.  Real molas are made by Kuna Indian women from pieces of brightly colored fabric that are stitched together.  The mola designs are worn on their blouses.  When the women tire of the blouses they cut the mola designs out and sell them to collectors.  Fish, birds, and flowers are often the subjects of molas.  
Students will be creating collages inspired by the mola designs.  They will sketch their animal and then begin cutting the shapes from construction paper.  Color patterns will be applied to the final layer of the collage in the mola style.
Look below to find extra credit and enrichment activities.

Option 1:  Look at Class Power Point
Look at the Power Point about mola that we viewed in class.  Ask an adult to sit with you.  Explain what you discussed and learned in class.  Look at the pictures of mola designs on slides 1, 3, 4, and 7.  Select the mola design you like best.  Describe what you see using your art words.  Write a description of your favorite mola in paragraph form.  Turn your paragraph in to Mrs. Wine with you name and class on the back.


Option 2:  Practice Drawing Animals
Find a picture of an animal or look at the pictures you were given in class.  Do a detailed drawing of that animal.  What are other details you could add to the background to finish the drawing and make it more interesting?  Add color if you choose.  Submit your drawing to Mrs. Wine with your name and class on the back. 


Horizontal Animal Pictures




TAG Project: Paper Mache Masks


Students in the third grade TAG class are creating paper mache masks.  They observed animal masks from African cultures.  They read about how masks were made and learned how they are often used in different ceremonies.  Students will sketch a plan for their animal mask.  Students will use plastic jugs (like a 1/2 gallon or gallon milk jug) as the basic armature of their mask.  They will build the rest of the armature with newspaper and cardboard.  Students will cover the mask with paper mache.  Then they will paint the masks, first with a dark color to cover the whole face, and then with 3 - 4 colors of their choice to add the details.  Finally, students will embellish the mask with raffia grass and/or beads. Look below for extra credit options for this project.

Option 1:  View the Power Point we looked at in class.  Write at least one paragraph to explain something you learned about African masks.  You can use the questions on the Power Point to help guide you.  Place your name and class on your work and turn it in to Mrs. Wine.

Animal Mask Power Point






Elements of Art Review


Third grade students are creating an Elements of Art sampler to place on the front of their art portfolio.  This will help students review the elements they have learned about in previous years.  It will also aid them in developing their written vocabulary as they begin to write more about their art and the art works of others.

Select an option below to complete.  Submit your response to Mrs. Wine to earn bonus points for your art grade.

Option 1:  Review the elements of art with a family member.  Look at this power point together as a family.  Students should be able to explain what they have learned about each element.  Discuss the artworks on the slides.  Write a short response to discuss what you learned together as a family.  You may discuss your favorite artwork from the Power Point, the elements you think are most important to you, or anything new that you learned.  Do not forget to put your name and class on your response.  You may give your written response to Mrs. Wine in class or have your parent email it to ewine@schools.nyc.gov




Option 2: Create a drawing of anything you want on unlined paper (Copy paper is fine.).  You may draw realistically, abstractly, or just make a design.  On the back of the drawing explain how you used at least two - three of the elements of art in your drawing.  Don't forget to write your name and class number on the back of your paper with your responses.  Bring your drawing and response to Mrs. Wine for extra credit.




Gyotaku Prints

     Third grade students are studying the Japanese art of Gyotaku.  Gyotaku means "fish rubbing" as was first created in Japan over 100 years ago.  Japanese fishermen used gyotaku as a way to accurately record the size of the fish they caught.  They painted ink on the fish and pressed a piece of rice paper on top to create the fish image.  Today gyotaku is done as an art form.
     In class, third grade students are drawing seaweed and underwater plants in crayon for the background of their gyotaku inspired artwork.  Then they will paint a watercolor wash using diluted liquid watercolors over the entire background. Small water drops will be sprayed onto the wet paper to create a texture that resembles bubbles in the water.  
     Students will practice drawing fish from observation.  They will engrave a foam plate with a large fish.  Each fish must include all main parts of the fish's anatomy and must include some type of pattern or design.  Acrylic paint will be applied to the printing plate and a piece of paper will be placed on top of the relief plate and rubbed, much as a real gyotaku print is created.  Students will cut out their fish print and glue it onto the background sheet.
     Look below for extra credit options:

Option 1:  Review Class Power Point
     Click the link below to review the power point we studied in class.  On a loose leaf sheet of paper write a paragraph explaining what you have learned about gyotaku printing.  Place your name and class on top of the loose leaf and turn it in when you come to art class.

Option 2:  Create a Detailed Fish Drawing
     Find a photo of in interesting fish by searching Google Images or looking in a book.  Explain to a parent what you know about the different body parts (anatomy) of a fish.  Create a detailed drawing of the fish on unlined paper.  (A sheet of copy paper will be fine.)  Place your name and class on the back of your drawing.  Return it to school the next day you have art.





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