2nd Grade

Keith Haring Drawing Project
Second grade students are studying the art of American artist Keith Haring.  Students will examine the art of Keith Haring to discover what his art looks like.  Then each student will create an original drawing in the style of Keith Haring using markers.  Drawings will include one or more figures in action, a symbol to express a feeling and a border with patterns.  

Choose an option below to explore more about Keith Haring.  Complete the activity and give it to Mrs. Wine to earn bonus points toward your art grade!!!

Option 1:  View the Power Point using the link below to review what we learned in class.  Answer at least one question together, students and parents.  Please write the question and your answer.  Do not forget to put your name and class on your work.  You can submit your work to me in class or have your parents email your answers to me at:  ewine@schools.nyc.gov



Option 2:  Visit Keith Haring's webpage created specifically for children.  Explore the different sections on this interactive site including books, activities and art.  Write two or three sentences to share something new that you learned about Haring or his art.  Do not forget to put your name and class on your work.  You can submit the responses to me in class or have your parents email them to:  ewine@schools.nyc.gov

Click here:  Haring Kids

Option 3:  Continue to practice drawing figures in action on your own at home.  Color your artworks with the medium of your choice: crayon, marker, colored pencil, or even paint.  Don't forget to sign your name and class on the back.  Bring your practice drawings to class.



LAST YEAR:



Paul Klee Emotional Line Project

Second grade students are studying the art of Swiss born artist Paul Klee.  Students looked at many of examples of Klee's abstract works that focused on the art elements of line and color.  Students are making small sketches where they are using different lines and colors to express feelings.  Students will enlarge their favorite sketch and revise it to create a final emotional line drawing.  Then students will work with a similar composition to create an emotional line painting.  At the end of the lesson, students will compare and contrast their two artworks.  

Choose one of the options below to extend your knowledge of Paul Klee and his work.  Select an activity to complete and earn bonus points toward your art grade.

Option 1:  View the Power Point presentation we discussed in class.  
Sit together, parent and art student, and examine this power point presentation we looked at in class.  Discuss the images you see in terms of Klee's use of line and color.  Answer one of the questions from the presentation together.  Make sure you include which slide number you were looking at as well as the question.  Answers may be written on loose leaf and turned in to Mrs. Wine during art class or may be typed and submitted via email to ewine@schools.nyc.gov.


Option 2:  Draw a Klee inspired doodle to music.
Paul Klee loved music.  His father was a violinist, so he was surrounded by music from the time he was a small child.  His favorite composers were Johann Sebastian Bach and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.  Not only were many artworks that Klee created influenced by his love of music, such as the blue painting "Heroic Fiddling" seen below.  Several musicians have composed musical pieces in response to Klee's paintings.  
Play a piece of music that your family enjoys listening to.  Place your pencil, crayon, or marker on the paper and let your dot go for a walk. (Remember Klee's quote, "A line is a dot that went for a walk.") Draw a few lines in the style of Paul Klee inspired by the music you are listening to.  Add some color to complete the artwork.  Place your name and class on the back and give the drawing to Mrs. Wine.


Option 3:  Draw an animal in the style of Paul Klee.
Ones of Paul Klee's most famous paintings is the "Cat and Bird" painting seen below.  Notice how he uses very simple lines to show the animals.  Create your own simple drawing of your favorite animal.  Add color in the medium of your choice such as crayon, marker, or colored pencil.  Place your name and class on the back of your drawing and turn it in to Mrs. Wine.



African Culture Arts

Adinkra Prints

     
     Students in class 2-228 are studying the art of adinrka printed cloth from West Africa. Students created an abstract symbol based on an object in nature. Symbols were drawn and cut from foam and applied to a cardboard backing.  Students will choose to work alone or with a partner to  a stamp pattern inspired by adinkra cloth.
     Look below for extra credit opportunities.

Option 1:  Review class Power Point
     View the Power Point presentation we looked at in class.  Answer one of the questions on the slides on loose leaf paper.  Write the question and the answer.  Place your name and class at the top of the paper.
Adinkra Print Power Point

Option 2:  Compare adinkra cloth to kente cloth.
     View the Power Point presentation from the second grade kente cloth project below.  Write one paragraph that compares and contrasts the adinkra cloth designs that your class is studying to the kente cloth designs that the other classes are studying.  You may choose to use a Venn diagram instead of writing in paragraph form if that helps you.  Tell at least 2 ways adinkra and kente cloth designs are alike and at least 2 ways they are different.

Kente Cloth Designs

     Second grade students in classes 2-325 and 2-328 are creating artworks inspired by African kente cloth patterns.  Students looked at a variety of kente cloth designs created in West Africa and examined how patterns are used in this woven cloth.  Students learned the different meanings in the colors used.
     Students are working with a partner.  Each partner is creating two color patterns using construction paper.  Then students are creating stamps by wrapping yarn around cardboard to create a line and shape design.  Students will apply black paint to their yarn stamps and stamp four pieces of cardboard paper each.  Then students will assemble their collage and print papers together with their partner.  Final artworks will mimic the look of African kente cloth.
     Look below for extra credit opportunities.

Option 1:  Review the class Power Point.
View the Power Point presentation we looked at in class.  Answer one of the questions on the slides on loose leaf paper.  Write the question and the answer.  Place your name and class at the top of the paper.

Option 2:  Compare adinkra cloth to kente cloth.
     View the Power Point presentation from the second grade adinkra cloth project above.  Write one paragraph that compares and contrasts the kente cloth designs that your class is studying to the adinkra cloth designs that the other class is studying.  You may choose to use a Venn diagram instead of writing in paragraph form if that helps you.  Tell at least 2 ways adinkra and kente cloth designs are alike and at least 2 ways they are different.





2nd Grade TAG Homework Extension

2nd Grade TAG students in Mrs. Matura's class are working on a special Keith Haring collaboration project in class.  Each student in the class began a final drawing in class and should have brought it home with the direction sheet attached.  Click below to view the Homework Extension Power Point that we looked at in class.  It includes samples of the homework project as well as project directions.  The homework sheet is also accessible below (in case some students lost the one given to them in class).











Sunnyside Neighborhood Prints and Collage

     Students in class 2-327 are doing a collaborative project that is an extension of a social studies unit from their regular classroom.  Students discussed the idea of community in their regular class.  They took a neighborhood walk and took their own photos of the community around our school.
     In art class, students looked at the works of Romare Bearden, especially his collage called The Block which can be seen in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Students learned about the life and work of Bearden.  They examined how he pieced together collages inspired by the Harlem neighborhood in which he lived.
     Students worked from photographs, both those they had taken on their neighborhood walk and some provided by Mrs. Wine.  Students drew from observation.  They discussed the concept of "artistic license" and revised their drawings, in some cases combining ideas from two different photos.  Each student engraved their image of a building or important structure in the Sunnyside community on a styrofoam plate.
     Parent volunteers will help students as they create two relief prints of their print.  Students will get to choose the color ink they use as well as the color of paper they print on.  Then students will work collaboratively with their table groups to create a collage using their prints and other papers.  Finally, all collages will be assembled to create a unique artwork about our community.
     Look below for extra credit opportunities.

Option 1:  Review Class Power Point
     Review the Power Point we viewed in class.  Answer 2 of the questions on loose leaf paper.  Make sure you write the question as well as your response.  Place you name and class on top of the paper and turn it in during your next art class.

Option 2:  Collage People for Your Group's Collage
     Romare Bearden pieced together people in his collages by using magazine and newspaper photos.  These collage people looked very interesting because the features of the face (eyes, nose, mouth, etc.) did not match the head.  
     Use newspapers and magazines from home to piece together some people to use in your group's collage.  Put heads on different bodies.  Add arms and legs from other photos.  Cut out eyes, noses, and mouths and layer them on top.  
     Bring your collage people into class to add to your group's collage of Sunnyside.




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